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Discussion Starter #1
:mad:

Ok, so sorry for this being my first post but I'm at a loss here on what to do. So last week I decided it was time to change the spark plugs on my wife's 08 Outlook; simple job, as I thought, the vehicle has 112k on it, and was only a bit sluggish, slightly rough idle, with bad gas mileage. The acdelco plugs were all special order items at my local auto parts stores, the auto parts store rep. recommended the next best direct fit plugs from his inventory: E3's.

I replace the old ACdelco plugs with the recommended E3's and torqued them to proper specs as suggested by the GM dealer (13-14lbs). The vehicle cranked up fine, the usual high idle, but then when it settled, it began immediate hesitation, very bad idle, and the check engine light flashed/blinked. I shut the vehicle off, rechecked everything, vacuum lines, torque, coils, wiring... nothing out of line. Start her back up... same thing, this time worse than the first, so I shut her off, and scan... I got P0300, and P0301 misfire cylinder 1. When I removed the plug from cylinder one, the porcelain was cracked and broken away from the electrode around the top. I then removed and checked all of the brand new E3 spark plugs and found every last one all 6, were cracked, bent, or broken around the top. I then put the old ACDelco's in with the the 100k+ miles on them, and got the same problem...only no P0300 code, but P303. I couldn't figure out the issue, so I had the car towed to my local shop. The diagnosis came back as "Faulty Injectors", cylinders 3, 2, and 5 were stuck open or not firing at all.

I ended up doing some research in reference to the E3 plugs, and discovered the cracking and faulty quality was a common problem. After speaking with the mechanics, they and I believe the problem came from the porcelain cracking away from the electrode, causing a voltage spike destroying the injectors. I don't want to get to far into the math of resistance and voltage drops across a resistor, but to simplify: the injector works off a constant 12 volts, and a ground to the ECU/ECM, the ECM sends a signal on the ground which closes the loop and opens the shutter/nozzle on the injector. What I'm thinking is that since the electrode was exposed in the head, the current was then distributed to the cylinder vs directed to the combustion chamber, at the same time the ECM sent signal to ground, which essentially caused something like an ESD (electro static discharge) over-loading the injector circuitry.

This being the case in my opinion, I don't think I should be responsible for the repair bill, and am seeking damages from the manufacture of E3 spark plugs. Has anyone here had similar issues with E3's or ever used them in their vehicle?
 

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Could a few coil packs have gone bad or have a problem with the connector?

When the porcelain cracked, did any break off inside and fall into the cylinder?
 

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Put the A/C delco plugs in there. Those E3's won't last you 100,000 miles like the OEM iridium plugs and I have read too many bad experiences with E3. The dealer has these plugs in stock because the 3.6 is a very common engine in many GM ehicles. If all were cracked maybe they were too long and made contact( highly doubt it) but you never know. If it ran fine before the plugs, you install new plugs and then it runs terrible, chances are the plugs are wrong or you left something loose.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The shop tested the coil packs, and harness, nothing was wrong with those. They tested the injectors and said that injectors for cylinders 1&3 were dead and ordered new ones from the dealer. As far as the porcelain, I'm sure a piece or two fell into the chamber once I pulled the plugs out.

My thing is I think E3 should cover my expenses, in having my vehicle repaired. It was their faulty plugs which caused the problem.

medicrxdoc said:
Could a few coil packs have gone bad or have a problem with the connector?

When the porcelain cracked, did any break off inside and fall into the cylinder?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Trust me, I know what I'm doing when it comes to engines. I didn't leave anything lose, I actually pulled out my micrometer and measured the gap and length of each, in addition to using a torque wrench to accurately set the plugs in accordance to manufactures specs. As for the E3's they're long gone!!!, I removed them only to find they had all broken porcelain. I ended up getting the stock/dealer ACDelco's, but the problem persisted which forced my hand, so I had to turn to my local shop. My computer / scanner showed a no voltage to the injectors under the idle duty cycle, its sorta like the Bosch KTS 340, just not that elaborate. The plugs cracked cause they are just a bad product line, like I stated in the aforementioned post, I did some research after I had this series of issues, and found a growing number of people that had the same problems. So in my opinion, this matter is a quality control issue with the manufacturer of the plugs.

Scotmbb107 said:
Put the A/C delco plugs in there. Those E3's won't last you 100,000 miles like the OEM iridium plugs and I have read too many bad experiences with E3. The dealer has these plugs in stock because the 3.6 is a very common engine in many GM ehicles. If all were cracked maybe they were too long and made contact( highly doubt it) but you never know. If it ran fine before the plugs, you install new plugs and then it runs terrible, chances are the plugs are wrong or you left something loose.
 

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Well, your correct that the defective plug manufacturer should be liable for the damage. I would start a case with them and see what they say. I might check with a product liability attorney on how to proceed so you don't unintentionally flaw a legal claim later should E3 maker not stand by their product.
 
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